Webinar: Dealing with Powers of Attorney Under the NC Uniform Power of Attorney Act

Date: November 9, 2017

Location: Online - Link will be sent the morning of November 9. The session will be pre-recorded, and attendees will be able to watch the webinar at their discretion.

Registration: $140 (Early Bird - 10/26) / $150 (Regular - after 10/26)

Please Click HERE to Register!

SPEAKER INFORMATION

The NCBA is very excited to be partnering with Ward and Smith on this webinar! 

Creekman Edited Photo

Jim Creekman

For the first 14 years of his professional career, Jim was a general practitioner and "country lawyer" in Hendersonville, North Carolina. In 1988, he disengaged from the private practice of law and accepted a senior management position with a local savings bank. When that bank was acquired by First-Citizens Bank & Trust Company in 1991, Jim moved to Raleigh and assumed the newly-created position of in-house counsel. Until 2012, he served as the senior in-house counsel for First Citizens Bank supporting the delivery of its financial products and services throughout the organization and, beginning in 2007, serving as its corporate secretary. He is well versed in the laws and regulations governing financial
institutions.

PROGRAM INFORMATION

This webinar will deal with the persistent challenge banks face on a daily basis—how to deal with an attorney-in-fact under a power of attorney.  Should we accept or reject the power of attorney?  Is the action the attorney-in-fact wants to take within the scope of the authority given the attorney-in-fact?  Will the action constitute impermissible self-dealing on the part of the attorney-in-fact?  Is the power of attorney durable or non-durable, and does that make a difference?  Has the power of attorney been recorded, and does that make a difference?  Will the Bank be exposed to liability if the Bank refuses to honor the power of attorney? 

Good judgment and common sense aside, existing law provides limited guidance on these issues.  However, some relief is on the way.  Beginning January 1, 2018, the North Carolina Uniform Power of Attorney Act will take effect, replacing much of the existing law governing powers of attorney.  This webinar will focus on significant changes to the law and how those changes will affect the way in which banks should deal with powers of attorney.